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Cain’s Blood

Ted Bundy. The Son of Sam. The Boston Strangler. Albert Fish. Henry Lee Lucas.

The DNA of the world’s most notorious serial killers has been cloned by the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a new breed of bioweapon. Now in Phase Three, the program includes dozens of young men who have no clue as to their evil heritage. Playing a twisted game of nature vs. nurture, scientists raise some of the clones with loving families and others in abusive circumstances. But everything changes when the most dangerous boys are set free by their creator. A man with demons of his own, former black ops soldier Shawn Castillo is hot on their trail. But Castillo didn’t count on the quiet young man he finds hiding in an abandoned house—a boy who has just learned he is the clone of Jeffrey Dahmer. As Jeffrey and Castillo race across the country on the trail of the rampaging teens, Castillo must protect the boy who is the embodiment of his biggest fears—and who may also be his last hope. Melding all-too-plausible science and ripped from- the-headlines horror, Cain’s Blood is a stunning debut about the potential for good and evil in us all.

Castillo is an ex-Special Ops member who spent time in Iraq, among some other places no man wants to see. The things he’s done and seen would make a grown man cry, and some would even crack from the pressure.  When his past commander presents him with the task of tracking down a group of vicious escaped serial killer clones and their spiritual leader, the geneticist Dr. Jacobson, PSTD becomes the least of his problems. Jeffrey Jacobson, son of Dr. Jacobson is a clone. Castillo battles with what Jeff is, isn’t, or could possibly be.

I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book, but when you mention DNA, cloning and serial killers, you’ve got my attention. I’m a lover of military stories, especially thrillers that portrays it’s characters a more than just foul mouth, gun-toting, killing machines. If that’s something you’re looking for then I suggest checking out Can’s Blood. It was a joy to read for this reviewer. A different twist on an old ethical, argument that will leave you wanting more.

Check out Girard’s YA novel Project Cain. It gives the story of Cain’s Blood from Jeff’s perspective. 

Sniper Elite: One-Way Trip Scott McEwen, Author

clip_image001IN DIRECT DEFIANCE of the president’s orders, Navy Master Chief Gil Shannon, one of America’s most lethal SEAL snipers, launches a bold mission comprised of SEAL Team Six and Delta Force fighters to free a captured female helicopter pilot being held by Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan.

The president is afraid a botched rescue could jeopardize US foreign policy as well as end his presidency. But once the special ops community learns that one of their own—the first female helicopter pilot of the Army’s elite 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR)—is being held and brutally mistreated, there is no executive order strong enough to stop them from attempting to rescue her.

This fast-paced, action-packed thriller with incredibly realistic and blistering battles introduces a new American hero, Gil Shannon, whose iron will and expertise with the .308 Remington Modular sniper rifle will spell the difference between freedom and an ignoble death for America’s female POW.

Sniper Elite is a wonderfully written military suspense novel. So much so, it had me longing for the days of my own military career. A military story without a doubt, but definitely written for even a person of nonmilitary background could enjoy as well. Filled with much intense action and, and high energy, I found it hard to believe that this book was mostly fiction, with a splash of actual special op missions. McEwen brings you into the real world of war.

Master Chief Gil Shannon is a REAL military man. One who lives, breathes and bleed, for each tour of duty and service. As hardcore as he may be, there is still a human core to this man, Shown by the love he expresses to his wife Marie.

While providing support during a black ops mission to observe a military training exercise in Afghanistan, their group is attacked by terrorists. Warrant Officer Sandra Brux, the first female pilot to serve in the elite Night Stalkers, is captured Sandra. The only survivor of the attach, she is taken prisoner and held at a secret location. A ransom is demanded for her release, but Brux is featured being brutally tortured, in a video sent to the government to receive a hasty payment.

The decision is delayed by considerations of how it will affect the upcoming re-election. If the public discovers the gender, and service record of the capture soldier, there could be backlash as to why there was a delay in her rescue. During the process of waiting for the President and his advisors to make a decision.

Shannon as had enough waiting, and pairs together with an Afghani translator assigned to the U.S. to roll out a rescue mission, combining a secret team of SEAL and DELTA Operatives. With a heartfelt call to his wife to make her understand this may be a one-way mission, Shannon sets out on a mission that without government support, may mean death for everyone on the team.

This was an awesome read, written so well that it takes you into the situations faced everyday by our military and special forces teams. Some of which may never be known by the public sector. For the love of country, and brotherhood of the individuals that serve by your side, decisions are made an carried out sometimes without the support that should be given to these brave souls. Thank you Scott McEwen for understanding, and painting a picture of truth with your words.

From the coauthor of the #1 New York Times bestselling American Sniper, this “inspired by true events” thriller follows one of America’s most lethal snipers as he leads the rescue of a downed female Special Ops pilot.

clip_image003Scott McEwen (1961- )is a trial attorney in San Diego, California. He grew up in the mountains of Eastern Oregon where he became an Eagle Scout; hiking, fishing, and hunting at every opportunity presented. He obtained his undergraduate degree in Oregon and thereafter studied and worked extensively in London, England. Scott works with and provides support for several military charitable organizations, including the Seal Team Foundation.

Scott’s interest in military history, intense patriotism, and experience with long-range hunting rifles, compelled him to accurately record the battlefield experiences of Chris Kyle, the most lethal sniper in United States military history.

Review: Out of the Blue: A Book of Color Idioms and Silly Pictures by Vanita Oelschlager

Out of the blue Hardcover, 40 pages
Published May 1st 2012 by VanitaBooks LLC

ISBN 0983290423 (ISBN13: 9780983290421)

Out of the Blue shows children the magic of idioms – words that separately have one meaning, but together take on something entirely different.
Children are curious about words, especially phrases that make them laugh (“Tickled Pink”), sound silly (“Shrinking Violet”) or trigger images that tickle a child’s sense of the absurd (“A Red Letter Day”).
Out of the Blue uses outlandish illustrations of what the words describe literally. The reader then has to guess the “real” meaning of the phrases (which are upside down in the corners of each spread). At the end of the book, the reader is invited to learn more about these figures of speech.

The first book of idioms, Birds of a Feather (2009), dealt with birds, insects or animals. The second, Life is a Bowl Full of Cherries (2011) uses food idioms. Out of the Blue uses color idioms. All three are fun – and instructive.

What a great idea for a children’s book! My daughter is only two and a half, but for an older child who questions everything and has heard a few of these familiar idioms, it’s a fun way to explain them. Out of the Blue is wonderfully illustrated, with a lot of silly pictures. Even as an adult I giggled a little. Even though my daughter isn’t old enough to understand the idioms, this book is a great teaching aid for moms. With my little one I found the book can also be used to teach children about colors, animals, and even counting.

I absolutely love this book! This is one for the family library. I plan on checking out Birds of a Feather, and Life is a Bowl Full of Cherries well. Great end of summer reads to get those little minds geared up for school.

Review: A Tale of Two Mommies, by Vanita Oelschlager

tale of two mommiesMike Blanc (Illustrator)

A Tale of Two Mommies is a beach conversation among three children. One boy asks another boy about having two mommies. A young girl listening in asks some questions too.
True to a child’s curiosity, practical questions follow. “Which mom is there when you want to go fishing? / Which mom helps out when Kitty goes missing?” To which he answers: “Mommy helps when I want to go fishing. / Both Mommies help when Kitty goes missing.”

 

A Tale of Two Mommies is intended for 4-8 year olds.
This book lets us look inside one non-traditional family, a same sex couple and their son. As the children talk, it’s clear this boy lives in a nurturing environment where the biggest issues are the everyday challenges of growing up.

Children talk. They ask questions. Especially about what’s different or unfamiliar. Answers are always honest and from the heart. Vanita Oelschlager does a great job in A Tale of Two Mommies displaying a child’s point of view of having same sex parents and the differences. The differences to the child? No more than any other child and a parent. All that matters is someone is there when they have a bad dream, someone is there to teach them that manners are an important quality to have in life, that someone is there when they have a bad day to listen and make it all better. It’s not important which parent kisses the boo-boo,  as long as it’s kissed. Responsibilities aren’t different just because there’s no mommy and daddy, cause mommy has it under control. Most of all what’s important to a same sex parented child…that they are loved—unconditionally and often.

The book expresses the ease of this acceptance from one child to another. The love the child has makes any question easy to answer and once the answer is given, curiosity has been fed and life is good—or that’s how most children see it.

A  wonderful story accompanied by bright and beautiful artwork. Great for those inquisitive children and parents who are searching for a way to explain why Janie or Johnny has two daddies or mommies.

Review: Simple Skincare, Beautiful Skin : A Back-to-Basics Approach

ISBN: 1608323838

EAN: 9781608323838

Category: Health & Fitness / General

Publisher: Greenleaf Book Group

Consumers are regularly confronted with advertisements and recommendations for a dizzying array of skincare products, not to mention conflicting messages about which skincare practices are the most beneficial. Simple Skincare, Beautiful Skin, a collection of Dr. Ahmed Abdullah’s most effective advice, empowers you with scientifically proven skincare facts presented in an easy-to-understand manner. Armed with information about the best skincare techniques, you’ll be capable of making smart choices about the products you use and the practices you employ to keep your skin looking its best.

As an independent cosmetics representative, I’m always searching for tips to pass on to my clients regarding skincare. It’s one of their top beauty concerns. Healthy skin should be a concern to us all.

Dr. Abdullah’s Simple Skincare, Beautiful Skin : A Back-to-Basics Approach, teaching skin care methods at a level that can be understood by anyone. I’m not a plastic surgeon, cosmetic surgeon, dermatologist or any other type of doctor, but I understand this book without an issues.

From his explanation of taking your skin care from day to night, and explaining it layer by layer, to informing us of what we should and should not place on our skin—Who knew aloe was something I needed in my arsenal?—I found this book to be not only jam packed with information that I will use in the future, but will also share with my clients and anyone else who has a skincare concern. If you’re interested in solving your skin issues, I’d suggest grabbing this book, and reading it thoroughly. I’m heading out to get my aloe right now.

Ahmed AbdullahDr. Ahmed Abdullah is a board-certified plastic and cosmetic surgeon actively practicing in the United States and Dubai, and a recognized expert on the restorative and medicinal effects of aloe vera. Additionally, he is an associate clinical professor in plastic surgery at the University of North Dakota School of Medicine, and founder/formulator of the Lexli® line of aloe-based professional skincare.
Despite his expertise in plastic surgery, Dr. Abdullah has proven that many common skin concerns can be avoided by optimizing skin health. His research has shown that the use of pharmaceutical-grade aloe vera is a beneficial tool in that effort. Thus, Dr. Abdullah travels the world educating licensed skincare professionals and consumers alike about the proper ways to utilize aloe in skincare applications, the essential steps to ensuring the skin’s basic needs are met, and setting the record straight on prevalent skincare myths.

Review: Seven Day Loan by Tiffany Reisz

clip_image002Seven Day Loan by Tiffany Reisz
Harlequin (2010)
eBook: 34 pages
ISBN: 9781426851599

A trained submissive, Eleanor will do whatever her master commands…even spend a week with a stranger. Daniel has been a recluse since his wife’s death, and Eleanor’s lover thinks spending time with her will be therapeutic—especially since Daniel is also a Dom.

Despite her defiant streak, Eleanor can’t resist giving in to Daniel’s erotic demands. But while she’ll let him have her body, she’s determined to keep a guard around her heart. Even if Daniel wants to make Eleanor his permanently….

Although it’s a short story, Reisz has managed to pull you in with such emotionally charged story, laced with a slap in the face sexuality. I’ve read many other erotic short story and found them to be nothing more than 35-40 pages of one sexual escapade after another and no real plot or story involved. It takes real talent to manage so much in so little pages.

Now don’t get me wrong. There was sex, and plenty of it. It was the story of this twenty-three year old woman Eleanor and her seven day adventure with Daniel, a shut in, who hasn’t ventured out in the world since the three years since his wife’s death.

Spending a week with these two and sharing their seven day adventure, provided more heat than the heat in Atlanta. Reisz had me at “pouting”. Add the Seven Day Loan to your vacation read list, and you may want to check out more on Eleanor in The Siren, (Seven Day Loan is a prequel to Reisz’s The Siren) also by Tiffany Reisz.

 clip_image004Tiffany Reisz lives in Lexington, Kentucky with her boyfriend and two cats (one that may or may not be the Anti-Christ). She graduated with a B.A. in English from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky and is making both her parents and her professors proud by writing erotica under her real name.

Tiffany has six piercings, one tattoo, and has been arrested twice. When not under arrest, Tiffany enjoys Latin Dance, Latin Men, and Latin Verbs. She dropped out of a conservative southern seminary in order to pursue her dream of becoming a smut peddler. Johnny Depp’s aunt was her fourth grade teacher. There is little to nothing interesting about her.

If she couldn’t write, she would die.

http://www.tiffanyreisz.com/storytime
twitter.com/tiffanyreisz

Dog on the Roof!: On the Road with Mitt and the Mutt

During a 1983 family vacation, Mitt Romney transported his family’s pet dog, Seamus, on the roof of an automobile for 12 hours. This incident became a subject of media attention for Romney in both the 2008 presidential election and the 2012 presidential election. We’ve all heard the story.. Now let’s get it from the dog’s mouth!

They were the typical American family on a typical American road trip—Dad behind the wheel, Mom in the passenger seat, their five adorable kids piled in the back. And, of course, their beloved dog strapped to the roof.

Wait . . . what?

Now for the first time, here is the completely true—and only mildly embellished— shaggy-dog story of Seamus Romney, the famously fetching Irish setter whose master, future presidential candidate Mitt Romney, plopped him atop the family station wagon for that infamous 1983 car trip. From the majesty of Mount Rushmore to the fabulousness of San Francisco, from the sacred temple of Salt Lake City to the hallowed halls of Washington, D.C., here at last is Seamus’s rooftop account of that headline-grabbing journey . . . unleashed.

Doggedly chronicled by satirists Bruce Kluger and David Slavin (NPR’s All Things Considered), and cleverly illustrated by Colleen Clapp (The Chris Matthews Show, NBC News), this American tale is more than just the story of a dog on a hot tin roof. It is the inside (well . . . overhead) look at the Man Who Would Be President and the wild ride that’s sweeping—and bewildering—the nation.

If you have a sense of humor and looking for a quick read, I suggest taking a look at Dog on the Roof!. The book shed’s a satirical look into the infamous family road trip from the dog’s point of view. I chuckled a little from the occasion canine comments, to Seamus’s illustrated expressions.

Strapping the family dog to the roof of the car isn’t something I condone, but I did enjoy ready Bruce Kluger and David Slavin’s take on the incident. Grab it for a chuckle. Grab it for a laugh. It’s a quick pick me up from the seriousness of politics.

Available from Simon & Schuster 19 June, 2012. $12.99